LAKE & PENINSULA BOROUGH

The Lake and Peninsula Borough is comprised of small commercial fishing communities and traditional Native villages. A significant number of residents rely on subsistence resources for their livelihood. The Borough experiences a large influx of fishing vessels and seafood processors during the summer months. Chignik has an important purse seine fishery and Egegik is mostly dependent on the Bristol Bay driftnet fishery. The other communities are involved in more localized fishing efforts in the Aleutians management area. There are also several floating and shore-based processors that operate in different locations within the borough.

 

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Chignik Lake

Chignik Lake lies next to the body of water of the same name, located on the southern shore of the Alaska Peninsula. Chignik Lake is primarily accessible by air, and a State-owned 2,800’ long gravel airstrip is located nearby. Regularly-scheduled and charter flights are provided, and seaplanes may land at Chignik Lagoon. Like most of the region, Chignik Lake depends on commercial fishing for much of its economic activity.

 

Photo Credit: DCCED; Div. of Community and Regional Affairs’ Community Photo Library

Chignik Lagoon

Chignik Lagoon took its name from its location and proximity to Chignik. The community sees an invasion of fishermen during the summer months, and the population can swell by up to 200 during the summer months. The Chignik Lagoon Village Council is a local federally-recognized tribe.

Chignik Bay

The City of Chignik is located on the south shore of the Alaska Peninsula, 450 miles southwest of Anchorage. The Chignik Bay Village Council is the local tribe, and the community is presently a mixture of Alutiiq and non-Natives. Commercial fishing and subsistence are the anchors of the local economy.

Egegik

Located on the Alaska Peninsula, Egegik lies on the south bank of the mouth of the Egegik River. Egegik has a strong year-round Alutiiq culture, and the Egegik Village Council is the community’s local tribe. Like many communities in Bristol Bay, the Egegik economy relies heavily on subsistence and the fishing industry. Its population can swell by 1,000-2,000 people involved in the fishing industry.

 

Photo Credit: DCCED; Div. of Community and Regional Affairs’ Community Photo Library

Ivanof Bay

Ivanof Bay is located on the northeast end of the Kupreanof Peninsula, 500 miles southwest of Anchorage and 250 miles southeast of Dillingham. Ivanof Bay has traditional Alutiiq influences, and practices a subsistence lifestyle. In summer, most residents leave the community to live and fish near Chignik. The Ivanof Bay Village Council is the community’s local tribe.

Iliamna

Iliamna is located 225 miles southwest of Anchorage, on the northwest side of Iliamna Lake. The population of the community consists of 57.8% Alaska Native or part Native, and the Iliamna Village Council is the local tribe. In recent years Iliamna has become a recreational and tourist attraction due to the excellent fishing at Iliamna Lake, the second largest lake in the US. Northern Dynasty Minerals Ltd. is exploring the gold, copper and molybdenum potential of the Pebble Deposit, 15 miles from Iliamna.

Igiugig

Igiugig is located on the south shore of the Kvichak River, which flows from Iliamna Lake, on the Alaska Peninsula. A federally-recognized tribe is located in the community — the Igiugig Village Council. Historically an Eskimo village, the population is now primarily Alutiiq, who depend upon commercial fishing and a subsistence lifestyle. Sport fishing attracts visitors during summer months. Igiugig is accessible primarily by water and air. The State owns and maintains a 3,000’ long gravel runway. A small public dock is available.

Kokhanok

Kokhanok is located on the south shore of Iliamna Lake, 88 miles northeast of King Salmon. A federally-recognized tribe is located in the community — the Kokhanok Village Council. The school is the largest employer in Kokhanok. Commercial fishing has declined since several limited entry permits were sold. Some residents travel to the Bristol Bay area each summer to fish. A State-owned 2,920’ long gravel airstrip and a seaplane base serve scheduled and charter air services from Anchorage, Iliamna, and King Salmon.

 

Photo Credit: DCCED; Div. of Community and Regional Affairs’ Community Photo Library

Levelock

Levelock is located on the west bank of the Kvichak River, 10 miles inland from Kvichak Bay. It lies 278 air miles southwest of Anchorage. The population of the community consists of 95.1% Alaska Native or part Native. Levelock is a mixed Alutiiq and Yup’ik village. Commercial fishing and subsistence activities are the focus of the community. Several seasonal lodges operate in the area. Levelock is accessible by air and water. In the winter, trails to surrounding villages are used.

Nondalton

Nondalton is located between Lake Clark and Lake Iliamna, 190 miles southwest of Anchorage. Nondalton formed an incorporated city government in 1971. The population of the community consists of 90% Alaska Native or part Native. Fishing in Bristol Bay is an important source of income in Nondalton, and firefighting is another source of summer employment. The community relies heavily on subsistence hunting and fishing. A State-owned runway services the community. Local villages support the construction of a 22-mile road between Nondalton and Iliamna.

 

Photo Credit: DCCED; Div. of Community and Regional Affairs’ Community Photo Library

Newhalen

Newhalen is located on the north shore of Iliamna Lake at the mouth of Newhalen River, 5 miles south of Iliamna and 320 miles southwest of Anchorage. The population of the community consists of 91.3% Alaska Native or part Native. Newhalen includes Yup’ik Eskimos, Alutiiq and Athabascans. The Newhalen Tribal Council is located in the community. There are two State-owned gravel airstrips located between Iliamna and Newhalen. Residents rely heavily on subsistence activities, and most families travel to fish camps during the summer.

 

Photo Credit: DCCED; Div. of Community and Regional Affairs’ Community Photo Library

Port Heiden

Port Heiden is 424 miles southwest of Anchorage, at the mouth of the Meshik River on the north side of the Alaska Peninsula. It lies near the Aniakchak National Preserve and Monument. A federally-recognized tribe is located in the community — the Port Heiden Village Council. The population of the community consists of 78.2% Alaska Native or part Native. Commercial fishing and government jobs provide the majority of cash income. Subsistence harvests of salmon, other fish and marine mammals average 109 lbs. per person.

 

Photo Credit: DCCED; Div. of Community and Regional Affairs’ Community Photo Library

Port Alsworth

Port Alsworth is on the east shore of Lake Clark at Hardenburg Bay. It sits in the Lake Clark National Park and Preserve. The population of the community consists of 22.1% Alaska Native or part Native. A number of houses are used only seasonally. There is no landfill — residents and lodges burn their own refuse. Port Alsworth offers several lodges and outfitters/guides for summer recreational enthusiasts. A few residents hold commercial fishing permits. There are two privately-owned and operated airstrips in the area.

Pilot Point

On the northern coast of the Alaska Peninsula resides Pilot Point, located on the east shore of Ugashik Bay. A federally-recognized tribe is located in the community — the Pilot Point Village Council. There is a history of ethnic diversity in Pilot Point. The community is primarily of Alutiiq ancestry, with Yup’ik Eskimos, and practices a fishing and subsistence lifestyle. The residents of Pilot Point depend upon commercial fishing for the majority of their cash income. A State-owned 3,280’ long gravel airstrip is available for aviation uses.

Perryville

Perryville is located on the south coast of the Alaska Peninsula, 275 miles southwest of Kodiak and 500 miles southwest of Anchorage. A federally-recognized tribe is located in the community — the Native Village of Perryville. The population of the community consists of 98.1% Alaska Native or part Native. The village maintains an Alutiiq culture and a subsistence lifestyle. Commercial fishing provides cash income. Perryville is accessible by air and sea, and ATVs and skiffs are the primary means of local transportation.

Pedro Bay

Pedro Bay is located at the east end of Iliamna Lake, at the head of Pedro Bay, 176 air miles southwest of Anchorage on the Alaska Peninsula. Pedro Bay is accessible by air and water. There is a State-owned 3,000’ long gravel airstrip, which is undergoing major improvements. The population of the community consists of 64% Alaska Native or part Native. Most residents obtain summer employment in the Bristol Bay fishery or in Iliamna Lake tourism services. Several wilderness lodges operate in Pedro Bay. Many families also rely on subsistence activities.

 

Photo Credit: DCCED; Div. of Community and Regional Affairs’ Community Photo Library

Ugashik

Ugashik is located on the northwest coast of the Alaska Peninsula, 16 miles up the Ugashik River. A federally-recognized tribe is located in the community — the Ugashik Traditional Council. The population of the community consists of 81.8% Alaska Native or part Native. Commercial fishing, fish processing and subsistence activities sustain residents of the area. There are three airstrips in the area. Barged freight is brought in from Naknek.

 

Photo Credit: Brian Hirsch, Deerstone Consulting